A few weeks ago, I had the opportunity to be part of the Kinect hackathon at the DEC here in Dallas. The event touted itself as a weekend where people could harness the Kinect to solve real world problems. I decided to instead treat it as a gamejam with a Kinect theme. This worked in my favor since our two man team won the contest and each of us walked away with a Kinect and split 500 dollars.

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I wrote a game in 6 hours. That’s not a typo. After getting home Monday, I decided I was going to write a game. Not only that, but I was also going to get it on the Google Play app store before going to bed. The game had to be super simple and fun. It had to have replay ability. From these requirements, You Jump On Birds was born. The timeline for everything is a bit hazy since I just went heads down the entire time. I’ll try to recount the effort and features I deemed necessary to release in this post. From that, you’ll have a good idea of the things I find essential in a game.
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Game jams give game developers an opportunity to flex game design skills but with a short deadline. Whether 48 hours or a whole month, game jams can be stressful when trying to get your game ‘done’. I shared tips and tricks on how to get the most out of a game jam before, during, and even after an event for the Dallas Society of Play.
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Hello world. Instead of waiting until I finish a game and write a postmortem, I will instead share my design process for my current project. The game is still untitled, but it was a long journey just to get to this point. I know where I’m headed with it now after weeks of thinking, tinkering, experimenting, and iterating. Read Full Article

Jump physics are complicated little pieces of code that can make or break your game especially if you’re doing a 2D platformer. I’ve spent so much time researching, implementing, and fine tuning jump physics, that I was actually able to bundle up my scripts for sale on the Unity Asset Store. As complicated as the code itself can get, the concepts are actually fairly easy to wrap your head around and this should be a good primer for getting started with jump physics and some of the common implementations.

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